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  • LoriCrawford-Spotlight

Lori Crawford

  • Program: Practical Nursing

    Education/Industry Certifications: Bachelor’s degree in Nursing from University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Master of Science degree in Nursing from Nebraska Wesleyan University

    Has Taught at SCC Since: 2007

    Years of Work Experience Outside SCC: Worked as an RN charge nurse on the Medical-Surgical Floor at Beatrice Community Hospital and as a Dialysis Nurse at the Dialysis Center of Lincoln (Beatrice unit) where I also was a charge nurse and the Infection Control Nurse.

    Describe your teaching philosophy.

    My teaching philosophy is to create a stimulating educational environment where students can grow mentally and emotionally. I believe in being a “facilitator” and “guide” for my students. The students need to have hands-on learning and be able to practice skills in a safe environment. I want to see my students achieve to their highest potential and will challenge them in the classroom, lab and clinical setting with questions and scenarios. In nursing, you rarely will take care of a “textbook” patient so the students need to understand how to apply knowledge to variations in the patients they will encounter. I teach the beginning lab class where students learn a great deal of nursing skills, but I stress to them the importance of not just doing the skill correctly, but also understanding the rationale for the steps within the skill.

    Why did you decide to teach at a community college?

    Honestly, I live in Beatrice and wanted to continue working in Beatrice because I have a family. The community college was my only choice, but over the years I have really come to appreciate what a community college has to offer our diverse student population. My opinion of a community college has changed since starting here, and I have witnessed the value SCC has in our community. SCC is an amazing place to start your education and offers many students opportunities they may have never had at a larger college or university. The students I have met at SCC are ones I probably would not have met at a university, and their stories of success are ones I am proud to be a part of.

    What can prospective students expect when they enroll in your program?

    Expect to work hard, learn a lot and have fun along the way. Being a nurse is challenging in many aspects, and the PN role is a very important role in the healthcare system that takes hard work and dedication. I believe you can work hard and have fun. We see our students more than their families see them, so we have to laugh along the way and see the positive and humor in life.

    What experiences outside of SCC do you bring to the classroom/laboratory that enhance student learning?

    My experience of being a mother has increased my flexibility.

    What advice do you have for students pursuing a degree in your program?

    Don’t memorize, understand! Figure out quirky ways to make connections to help remember the information. Know your anatomy/physiology, medications and fluid and electrolytes. These are tough concepts, but they play a part in everything we learn.

    What do you enjoy most about working with students?

    Being a part of their nursing education during the good and the bad. We see them walk into class their first day of nursing school excited, then the reality sets in and the hard work begins. I have great joy in seeing the struggle, success and excitement as they conquer skills, understand concepts and bond with others in the program.

    What is the best part about being an SCC faculty member?

    I enjoy the “small town” feel of the community college.

    What has been your proudest moment as an instructor?

    There have been several, but I love to hear the student stories about being the first to go to college in their family and how we helped them realize they can be in a profession.

    What do you like to do when you’re not teaching?

    I’m not sure how I got into running, but that’s what I find myself doing for “me time.” I have several friends that run, so it has become very therapeutic to run with them or to run by myself enjoying the beauty of the outdoors. My husband and I have three children, two of which are in high school, so I find myself at cross country, football, basketball, baseball, and track activities.

    What would students be surprised to know about you?

    I was not the one who had a goal to be a nurse in college. I went to college to be a pharmacist, but when I realized how much I disliked chemistry, I had to figure something else out. My husband is the one who suggested nursing, and everything ended up falling into place. I had no idea what I was getting myself into signing up for nursing school, but I’m thankful how my life worked out. I have grown to love nursing and teaching as my career. I tell this story to my students because too often we expect our students to have a clear goal and answer for “why do you want to become a nurse?” Many students may not exactly know why they decided to try nursing, and that’s OK.